Department of Philosophy and Religion

Bachelor of Arts

Craig M. Duncan, Associate Professor and Chairperson

The Department of Philosophy and Religion offers courses that develop critical and creative skills, as well as broad-ranging knowledge of fundamental beliefs and ideas. Such skills and knowledge are brought about by:

  1. training students in the analysis and clarification of concepts involved in all forms of thinking, whether legal, medical, political, scientific, or metaphysical;
  2. systematically analyzing and evaluating topics of perennial human interest, such as religion, art, and morality;
  3. and challenging students to articulate and develop their own ideas in the context of argumentation.
  • The Introduction to Philosophy courses (PHIL 10100 and PHIL 10200) are highly recommended as stepping-stones to all other courses in philosophy.
  • The Introduction to World Religions courses (RLST 10500 and RLST 10600) are highly recommended as stepping-stones to all other courses in religious studies.

Requirements for Honors in Philosophy and Religion

Honors in the Department of Philosophy and Religion are offered for the purpose of encouraging, challenging, and recognizing majors and minors who undertake advanced academic work.

Majors and minors in the department may apply for honors by submitting an honors thesis. Written application to the honors program must be made to the department chair early in the senior year. A minimum GPA of 3.50 in the major or minor is required.

An adviser and a second reader are appointed by the chair in consultation with the student and members of the faculty. The adviser supervises the writing of the thesis, which should be at most 30 pages long and must be completed by March 31. The departmental faculty decides whether the thesis has earned honors designation. Then, if the student wishes, the adviser arranges for an oral presentation of the accepted thesis to the departmental faculty, guests, and other philosophy and religion majors and minors.

Philosophy

Philosophy is the most conceptually fundamental of the liberal arts. It is that academic discipline that is most concerned with ideas. The student majoring in philosophy is trained to understand abstract ideas and their relations to one another and the world, to learn what have been among the most influential ideas in human history from ancient Greece to the present, and to enter into the dialectical process of rational disputation concerning those ideas. 

Religious Studies

The study of religion is multidisciplinary, cultivating a wide array of interpretive skills from related fields of study. Students in religious studies explore the meaning of myths, symbols, historical events, rituals, personal experiences, and classic texts, and consider how participants in world religions continually reinterpret existing traditions and apply them to new cultural contexts. Religious studies offers an excellent basis for careers in the human service professions, such as counseling, social work, or teaching; in business and professions involving work with people from diverse cultures; and in all forms of creative activity, including writing and other fine arts.

Subjects in this department include: Philosophy (PHIL) and Religious Studies (RLST)

Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 10100 Introduction to Philosophy (LA)

Introduction to philosophy that focuses on perennial philosophical problems, such as the relation of the mind to the body, the possibility of truth and objectivity, the purpose of human life, and the existence of God, utilizing classical, modern, or contemporary works. (F-S,Y)
Attributes: 1, HM, HU, LMSP, TIDE, TMBS
3 Credits

PHIL 10200 Introduction to Philosophy: Greek Foundations (LA)

Introduction to philosophy through the study of Greek thought as the foundation of the Western philosophical tradition. Covers the pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. (IRR)
Attributes: CSA, HM, HU, TIII
3 Credits

PHIL 15100 Reasoning (LA)

An introduction to the techniques of organized thinking. The course focuses on three areas: (1) the analysis and evaluation of passages that contain reasoning; (2) the fundamentals of logic; and (3) problem solving by deduction. The first two areas serve to increase the student's comprehension of argumentative discourse. The third involves the marshaling of facts and data to arrive at conclusions. (F-S,Y)
Attributes: 2B, HU, LMSP
3 Credits

PHIL 17500-17505 Selected Topics in Philosophy (LA)

Topics to be determined according to teacher and student interest. (IRR)
Attributes: 1, HU
3 Credits

PHIL 20100 Plato and Aristotle (LA)

Study of selected texts and ideas of the founders of classical Western philosophy. Texts include selected dialogues of Plato and selections from Aristotle's writings, including the "Metaphysics" and "Nichomachean Ethics." Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: CSA, HU
3 Credits

PHIL 20300 Introduction to Logic (LA)

Covers the traditional logic of the syllogism and the logic of truth functions. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and passing score on QL readiness exam. (F-S,Y)
Attributes: 2B, HM, LMSP, NS, QL, TWOS
3 Credits

PHIL 20400 Choosing Wisely: An Introduction to Raional Choice (LA)

An introduction to rational choice theory, a theory that proposes rules that prescribe how individuals ought to behave so as to best satisfy their preferences. Special attention is paid to representing preferences numerically and using that formal representation to determine which action among a set of possible actions should be chosen. Applications include uses of probability and decision theory in epistemology, the philosophy of religion, and ethics. Some applications outside of philosophy are discussed as well, including economics, voting theory, and biology. General topics covered include probability, decision theory, game theory, and social choice. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (F-S,Y)
Attributes: NS, QL
3 Credits

PHIL 21200 Introduction to Ethics (LA)

Introduction to the problems and theories of normative thinking. Is there a right thing to do, and how can we tell what it is? Contemporary moral issues, such as abortion, capital punishment, discrimination, war, aid to the needy, require us to reflect carefully on fundamental topics in ethics, including rights, human dignity, responsibility, and the value of life. Readings selected from both classical and modern sources. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. (Y)
Attributes: 1, HM, HU, LMSP, TIDE
3 Credits

PHIL 22000 Political Philosophy (LA)

Introduction to the central questions of political philosophy. Topics include the disputed necessity of a political authority; various attempts to justify a political obligation to comply with the demands of the state; an examination of the merits and weaknesses of democracy as a legitimate form of governing; the proper scope of a right to liberty within a democratic society; and questions of distributive justice, including the justice of redistribution of wealth to rectify large social inequities. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: 1, HM, HU, LMSP, TPJ
3 Credits

PHIL 22300 Introduction to the Philosophy of Art (LA)

Analysis of the problem of defining art, examination of criteria used to evaluate artworks, illustration of Langer's principles of art, and consideration of avant-garde and Marxist views of art. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HM, HU, TIII
3 Credits

PHIL 22500 Science and Pseudoscience (LA)

Examination of selected issues concerning scientific methodology and the demarcation of genuine science from phony science (pseudoscience). Issues include the role of observational evidence in confirmation and disconfirmation of scientific hypotheses, properties a hypothesis must have to be empirical and therefore refutable, and the ways scientific explanation differs from nonscientific explanations. Students learn how to distinguish legitimate science from nonscientific belief systems that attempt to pass as science in the eyes of the public. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

PHIL 23000 Bioethics (LA)

Bioethics focuses on moral questions about life, human and non-human. It explores the reasoning and moral principles at stake in medical decisions, including, for example, abortion, euthanasia, medical experimentation, and distribution of health care. The moral dimensions of broader life issues, such as cloning and reproductive technology, are also relevant. Such practical topics in bioethics force us to reflect on fundamental ethical matters, including the nature of morality, rights, and the value of life. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. (F-S)
Attributes: HM, LMSP, TMBS
3 Credits

PHIL 24000 Philosophy in Film (LA)

Exploration of various philosophical issues conveyed in film. The course uses the narratives in film to illustrate various philosophical issues and offers philosophical reflection as an interpretive medium to understand films. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: 1, HU
3 Credits

PHIL 25200 Environmental Ethics (LA)

A critical examination of various moral problems raised when considering environmental issues. Questions regarding the moral status of animals, future generations, and the environment as a whole are explored. Also taken up are the moral aspects of famine relief, population control, and resource use. These issues and others generate challenging and fundamental questions of moral philosophy: What is the basis of obligation? Do animals have rights? What does it mean to say something is intrinisically valuable? Cross-listed with ENVS 25200; students cannot receive credit for both PHIL 25200 and ENVS 25200. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. (Y)
Attributes: 1, HM, HU, TQSF
3 Credits

PHIL 26000 Difference and Community (LA)

Individuals sometimes find themselves at odds with the larger community, as do minority groups whose ways of life are unfamiliar or alarming to those in the majority. How should we balance the often competing demands of individuals, groups, and the larger community? What sort of community, if any, is possible despite our individual and group differences? To answer questions such as these, this course will examine philosophical debates over individual liberty, toleration, and multiculturalism. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. (F,O)
Attributes: HM, HU, TIDE, TPJ
3 Credits

PHIL 26500 Philosophical Problems in Law (LA)

Examination and evaluation of basic practices and principles of law, focusing on such topics as the nature and extent of legal authority, the interpretation of law, and the justification of punishment, including capital punishment. Examination of prominent legal cases and their underlying principles. Emphasis is placed on philosophical analysis and moral evaluation. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. (Y)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

PHIL 27500-27505 Selected Topics in Philosophy (LA)

Topics to be determined according to teacher and student interest. Prerequisites:Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: 1, HU
3 Credits

PHIL 28300 Introduction to Buddhism (LA)

Study of the life and teaching of Gautama Buddha, and of the development of Theravada Buddhism in Southeast Asia and Mahayana Buddhism in the Far East. Reading and discussion of the Buddhist scriptures and Zen writings. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. (E)
Attributes: 1, G, H, HU
3 Credits

PHIL 28600 Philosophy and Literature (LA)

Explores philosophical issues related to literary fiction and focuses on philosophical questions related to literary discourse. Questions range from 'Do fictional entities exist?' and 'How is it possible to be emotionally moved by fictional events and characters?' to 'How do metaphors work?' and 'Who are the genuine authors of literary texts?' Prerequisites: WRTG 10600 or ICSM 10800 or ICSM 11800; sophomore standing. (IRR)
Attributes: WI
3 Credits

PHIL 30100 Seventeenth Century Philosophy: God, Self, World (LA)

Study of early British empiricism and continental rationalism with an emphasis on the works of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

PHIL 30200 Eighteenth-Century Philosophy: Perception, Causation, and the Limits of Human Reason (LA)

Study of Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

PHIL 31100 Philosophy of Religion (LA)

Study and discussion of a broad range of issues in the philosophy of religion, such as religious epistemology, the ontological argument, the cosmological argument, the teleological argument, religion and science, and the problem of evil. Primary source readings. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU, LMSP
3 Credits

PHIL 31300 Marxist Philosophy (LA)

Analysis of the basic elements of Marx's philosophy: dialectical materialism, economic determinism, ethical relativism, ideology and science, and the thesis of class struggle and exploitation. Examines how these concepts might be applied to contemporary capitalist development. Seminar. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

PHIL 32100 Symbolic Logic (LA)

A continuation of PHIL 20300 Introduction to Logic. Logical techniques instrumental to the development of 20th-century philosophy: truth-functional analysis, quantification, the logic of relations, definite descriptions, modal logic, etc. Prerequisites: PHIL 20300 or MATH 26000. (IRR)
Attributes: NS
3 Credits

PHIL 32600 Seminar in Aesthetics (LA)

Examination of traditional and contemporary aesthetic concepts such as empathy, psychic distance, the beautiful and the sublime, and expressive form, with special attention to the nature of aesthetic responsiveness and judgment, and the kind of meaning to be found in art. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

PHIL 33000 The Good Life (LA)

This course examines one of the oldest and most compelling questions of all time: What is a good life? We all want good lives and we all strive to achieve good lives, but despite the overriding importance of the question, we give little reflective thought to what a good life might be. Is there one particular form that a life must exemplify in order to be good, or are there many kinds of good lives? Is judging a life to be good sufficient for it to be good, or is this the sort of thing one can get wrong? The course will consider what great thinkers -- classical, modern, and contemporary -- have written on this issue. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

PHIL 34000 Global Ethics (LA)

The course surveys significant ethical challenges that are global in scope: Are there such things as universal human rights, or is morality ultimately relative to one's particular culture? What, if any, duties do we have to the global environment? What is the difference between a just and unjust war, and between just and unjust ways of combating terrorism? Morally speaking, what can be said in defense of economic globalization, and against it? Are global inequalities in wealth morally defensible? Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (F, E)
Attributes: HU, LMSP
3 Credits

PHIL 34800 Epistemology: Theories of Knowledge and Justified Belief (LA)

Philosophical study of knowledge and justified belief, with an emphasis on how these are possible in the face of skeptical threats. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

PHIL 35000 Philosophy of Science (LA)

A comprehensive survey of issues in the philosophical foundations of science. Topics include the structure and function of scientific theories; the dispute over the existence or nonexistence of theoretical entities; reductionism and antireductionism; laws of nature and models of scientific explanation; Kuhn and historicist models of science; the realism/antirealism dispute over the philosophical implications of scientific theories. Prerequisites: PHIL 20300 or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

PHIL 35200 Moral Philosophy (LA)

Critical exploration of foundational issues in metaethics and normative ethical theory. Topics for consideration include moral relativism, moral realism, and morality and self-interest, along with utilitarian, deontological, natural law, and contractarian theories of ethics. Moral concepts such as rights, duty, and value will also be considered. Readings will be from both classical and contemporary sources. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU, LMSP
3 Credits

PHIL 35500 Metaphysics (LA)

Metaphysics is the philosophical investigation into the ultimate nature of reality. This course examines issues and answers in traditional and contemporary metaphysics. Topics include personal identity, causality, determinism, essence and accident, mind and matter, and the nature of God. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: 1, HU
3 Credits

PHIL 36000 Philosophy of Mind (LA)

The distinctive feature of human beings that traditionally has been held to separate us from the rest of the universe is our supposed possession of a special thing/capacity called "mind." In this course we investigate what kind of thing (or non-thing) the mind is, what relation it has to bodily behavior, and how and why the mind has the extraordinary ability to represent the world truly or falsely. Topics include such questions as, Is the mind physical or non-physical? What is a mental state? What kinds of beings can possess minds? Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: 1, HU
3 Credits

PHIL 36200 Philosophy of Language (LA)

Investigation of philosophical questions concerning linguistic representation, particularly concerning the meanings of names, definite descriptions, and sentences, and how those linguistic expressions acquire their meanings. Further topics include whether metaphors have meaning, whether meaning is subjective or public, and whether representation is the only function of language. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
3 Credits

PHIL 37500-37510 Selected Topics in Philosophy (LA)

Topics to be determined according to student and teacher interest, with primary focus on a problem or a person. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
1-4 Credits

PHIL 38100 Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (LA)

Major philosophical movements in the 19th century. Emphasis is placed on selections from the works of Hegel, Mill, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

PHIL 38200 Themes in Twentieth Century Philosophy: Language, Mind, and Meaning (LA)

Investigates the main trends and concerns of 20th century analytic philosophy. Readings will be from important works in logical positivism, the philosophy of the later Wittgenstein, and recent varieties of pragmatism and naturalism. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

PHIL 38400 Existentialism (LA)

In-depth philosophical analysis of concepts such as authenticity, the meaning of life, freedom of choice, responsibility, and mortality in the works of 20th-century existentialist thinkers such as Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus, and their 19th-century precursors such as Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: GERM, HU
3 Credits

PHIL 39100-39101 Independent Study: Philosophy (LA)

Study or research project of the student's own devising. Minimal consultation with professor; final projects evaluated by professor. Offered on demand only. May be repeated for credit for different projects. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course and permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: UND
1-4 Credits

PHIL 39300-39301 Tutorial in Philosophy (LA)

Work by student and teacher on a problem or project of interest to both. Prerequisites: At least one 20000-level PHIL course and permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: UND
1-4 Credits

PHIL 41000 Philosophy Capstone Seminar (LA)

Serves as the capstone for philosophy majors and minors. Synthesizes students' experience in the program by having students apply the philosophical skills they have acquired in previous classes to a faculty-guided, largely independent research project on a prominent philosophical position, movement, or debate. Facilitates student reflection on achievements in both the major/minor and the Integrative Core Curriculum, and how these relate to personal intellectual formation while at Ithaca College. Prerequisites: WRTG 10600 or ICSM 108xx or ICSM 118xx; senior standing; restricted to philosophy majors, philosophy-religion majors, philosophy minors. (S,Y)
Attributes: CP, HU, WI
3 Credits

PHIL 49100-49101 Independent Study: Philosophy (LA)

Study or research project of the student's own devising. Minimal consultation with professor; final projects evaluated by professor. Offered on demand only. May be repeated for credit for different projects. Prerequisites: At least one 30000-level PHIL course and permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: UND
1-4 Credits

PHIL 49300-49301 Tutorial in Philosophy (LA)

Work by student and teacher on a problem or project of interest to both. Prerequisites: At least one 30000-level PHIL course and permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: UND
1-4 Credits

PHIL 49500-49501 Philosophy Seminar (LA)

Small group study of a topic not otherwise offered in the curriculum or not offered at the same level. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: At least one 30000-level PHIL course and permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
1-4 Credits

Religious Studies (RLST)

RLST 10300 Hebrew Scriptures (LA)

This course treats the books of the Bible critically as literature, as religious and moral texts, and as a source of sociological knowledge. It surveys the biblical literature, acquaints the students with critical methods for the study of the Bible, situates the Bible within the literature and culture of the ancient Near East, and discusses the religion of ancient Israel. Deals with questions of history and archaeology, and with questions of meaning -- what the biblical text meant to its ancient readers, and what meanings it has today. Cross-listed with JWST 10300. Students may not receive credit for both RLST 10300 and JWST 10300. (F,Y)
Attributes: 3A, H, HM, HU, TIDE, TMBS
3 Credits

RLST 10400 Introduction to the New Testament (LA)

A survey of the life and teaching of Jesus, and major themes in the Pauline Epistles and the Book of Revelation. (IRR)
Attributes: 1, HM, HU, TIDE, TIII
3 Credits

RLST 10500 Introduction to World Religions: Indigenous and Eastern (LA)

Examines methods in the study of religion and the meaning of ritual, myth, and symbols as applied to Native American and other indigenous religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and other Asian traditions. Compares ideas of divinity, methods of liberation, life after death, attitudes toward nature, ways of living in society, and world views. (F,Y)
Attributes: 1, G, H, HM, HU, NACI, TMBS
3 Credits

RLST 10600 Introduction to World Religions: Western and Modern (LA)

Introduces the academic study of religion through exploration of the historical development of the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions. Emphasizes how religious beliefs and practices evolve in response to historic events and changing cultural contexts, including the challenges posed by modernity and postmodernity. (S,Y)
Attributes: 1, G, H, HM, HU, TIDE, TMBS
3 Credits

RLST 17500-17510 Selected Topics in Religion (LA)

Topics to be determined according to teacher and student interest. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

RLST 20100 Religion and Culture (LA)

Study of the mutual relations between religion and culture. The course explores the religious dimension of art, music, and other contemporary media, and considers the way religious symbols influence cultural and social movements. Students study both Western and non-Western examples, of the intersection between religion and culture in art, music, literature, ritual, film, and games. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (Y)
Attributes: 1, HM, HU, LMSP, LSSP, TIII
3 Credits

RLST 20200 Religion and Society (LA)

Studies the social dimensions of religion and religion's influence on societies, on matters ranging from economics to ultimate concern. Major themes include the political mobilization of religions in social change movements, the social patterning of religious ideas and their relations with other ideologies, and the issue of religion as a topic in critical social theory. Cross-cultural with varying historical examples. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (E)
Attributes: 1, G, H, HM, HU, TIDE
3 Credits

RLST 20300 Judaism (LA)

An introduction to Judaism, with a focus on theology, ethics, and ritual practice. Readings include selected texts from the biblical, rabbinic, medieval, and modern periods. Theological and ethical issues include God, good and evil, covenant, death and afterlife, justice, and social responsibility. The course examines how these Jewish understandings are lived out through practices associated with birth and death; marriage and commitment; sexuality; and the life of study, prayer, and devotion. Cross-listed with JWST 20300. Students may not receive credit for both RLST 20300 and JWST 20300. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (S,Y)
Attributes: 1, G, HM, HU, TIDE, TMBS
3 Credits

RLST 20400 Christianity (LA)

A survey of the Gospel accounts of Jesus and the historical development of Christianity, including major theological themes and issues. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above. (O)
Attributes: 1, G, H, HU
3 Credits

RLST 20500 Islam (LA)

Introduces the origins, historical development, major institutions, and central beliefs and practices of Islamic tradition. Particular attention is given to contemporary debates in Islamic studies that shape our understanding of Islam and to Islamic responses to modern challenges of pluralism, feminism, and violence. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above. (F,Y)
Attributes: 1, DV, G, H, HM, HU, TIDE, TMBS
3 Credits

RLST 20700 Death and Immortality (LA)

Introduces eastern and western world religions through a thematic exploration of religious beliefs and practices associated with death, both in traditional and contemporary contexts. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (Y)
Attributes: 1, H, HM, HU, TMBS
3 Credits

RLST 22100 Religion and Depth Psychology (LA)

Studies Freudian, Jungian, humanistic, and transpersonal psychologies with respect to issues in religion including dream theory, the individuation process, psychological types, self-actualization, peak and plateau experiences, death, psychological aspects of worship, values, the psychology of meditation, and levels of consciousness. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (O)
Attributes: 1, HU
3 Credits

RLST 23500 Religion and Nature (LA)

Explores interrelationships between aspects of the natural world and the beliefs and practices of diverse world religions. Topics may include sacred space and time, natural symbols, animals and animality, and religious environmentalism. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Cross-listed with ENVS 23500; students cannot receive credit for both RLST 23500 and ENVS 23500. (E)
Attributes: HM, HU, TMBS, TQSF
3 Credits

RLST 25200 Introduction to Mysticism (LA)

Drawing from the mysticism of world religions, thid course focuses on the mystical process (i.e., what happens to the mystic on his or her journey to "deepest reality") and the ways to reach this goal. Topics include stages of the mystical path; voices and visions; love or bridal mysticism; meditation and contemplation; and mysticism in the world of action, science, and the occult. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (E)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

RLST 25500 Religions in America (LA)

A sociohistorical survey of the varieties of religions in North America, including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, new religious movements, and religions of various ethnic groups, such as Native American religions and African American religions. Emphasizes the role religion plays in the political and ethical spheres of American life. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

RLST 27500-27510 Selected Topics in Religion (LA)

Topics to be determined according to teacher and student interest. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

RLST 28100 Hinduism (LA)

A historical survey of the development of Hinduism from its origin in the Vedic religion to the modern Vedantism. Reading and discussion on the Upanishads, the Bhagavad-Gita, and the Yoga Sutra. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (O)
Attributes: 1, DV, G, HM, HU, TMBS
3 Credits

RLST 28300 Introduction to Buddhism (LA)

Study of the life and teachings of the historical Buddha, development of Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana traditions in Asia and their globalization in the contemporary world, utilizing both classic and contemporary texts. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (E)
Attributes: 1, G, H, HU
3 Credits

RLST 30500 Comparative Study of Religions (LA)

Examines major issues in various religious traditions and applies typological and phenomenological analysis to common themes, such as the concept of god(s), the nature of man, the problem of evil, ways of salvation, patterns of rituals, and types of religious organization. Prerequisites: one 200-level RLST course. (E)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

RLST 31100 Philosophy of Religion (LA)

Study and discussion of a broad range of issues in the philosophy of religion, such as religious epistemology, the ontological argument, the cosmological argument, the teleological argument, religion and science, and the problem of evil. Primary source readings. Prerequisites: One 20000-level PHIL course. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

RLST 32000 Anthropology of Religion (LA)

The religious experience from the standpoint of ethnographic field studies and from various theoretical approaches. Examines the relationships among religion, culture, and society. Explores the evolution of the anthropological study of religion. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 32000; students cannot take both ANTH 32000 and RLST 32000 for credit. Prerequisites: ANTH 10400; sophomore standing. (Y)
Attributes: SS
3 Credits

RLST 32300 Gender and Sexuality in Judaism (LA)

Exploration of what it means to be a Jewish man or woman. The course addresses how Jewish gender roles have changed throughout history, as well as how contemporary Jews deal with changes in women's roles and demands for gender equality. Topics covered include what is "gender" and how to study it; traditional roles of men and women in Judaism; the gendered Jewish body; family and sexuality; homosexuality; Jewish feminism; the gender of God; and changing women's religious roles. Cross-listed with JWST 32300. Students may not receive credit for both RLST 32300 and JWST 32300. Prerequisites: Junior standing. (Y)
Attributes: 1, HU
3 Credits

RLST 33300 Jewish Mysticism (LA)

This course traces the history of Jewish mysticism. After a brief overview of early Jewish mysticism from the biblical and rabbinic periods, students will concentrate on the medieval flowering of Kabbalah, and its further development in the 16th-century Kabbalah of Safed and Israel and 18th-century Eastern European Hasidism. The emphasis will be on understanding both the theoretical and experiential aspects of Jewish mysticism, and on examining some of the key texts of Jewish mysticism. Cross-listed with JWST 33300. Students may not receive credit for both RLST 33300 and JWST 33300. Prerequisites: Junior standing. (Y)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

RLST 35300 Twentieth-Century Mysticism (LA)

Study of the major trends in 20th-century mysticism through the writings of key mystics. Topics include earth and esoteric spiritualistics, the influence of Eastern spiritualistics on the West, and current Jewish, Christian, and Sufi ideas. The writings of Teilhard de Chardin, Thomas Merton, and Yogananda, as well as works from the Native American and Sufi traditions, are studied. Prerequisites: RLST 25200. (E)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

RLST 37500-37512 Selected Topics in Religion (LA)

Topics to be determined according to teacher and student interest. Prerequisites: One 20000-level RLST course. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits

RLST 37700 Women and Religion (LA)

A study of the emerging issues regarding women and religion, including the psychology of women's spiritual journey, the importance of the feminine or yin dimension of reality, the role of women in ancient and traditional religions, and new forms of feminine spirituality. Prerequisites: One 20000-level RLST course. (O)
Attributes: HU, WGS, WGS3
3 Credits

RLST 39100-39101 Independent Study: Religion (LA)

Study or research project(s) of the student's own devising. Minimal consultation with professor; final project(s) evaluated by professor. Offered on demand only. May be repeated for credit for different projects. Prerequisites: One 20000-level RLST course and permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: UND
1-4 Credits

RLST 39300-39301 Tutorial in Religion (LA)

Work by student and teacher together on a problem or project of interest to both. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: One 20000-level RLST course and permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: UND
1-4 Credits

RLST 41000 Religious Studies Capstone (LA)

Serves as the capstone for philosophy/religious studies majors and religious studies minors. Synthesizes the student's experience in the program by drawing on key themes, issues, and movements in contemporary, global religious practice at an advanced level. Facilitates student reflection on achievements in both the major/minor and the Integrative Core Curriculum, and how these relate to personal intellectual formation while at Ithaca College. Prerequisites: WRTG 10600 or ICSM 108xx or ICSM 118xx; at least three courses in religious studies with at least one course at the 300 or 400 level; senior standing. (S,Y)
Attributes: CP, HU, WI
3 Credits

RLST 49100-49101 Independent Study: Religion (LA)

Study or research project(s) of the student's own devising. Minimal consultation with professor; final project(s) evaluated by professor. Offered on demand only. May be repeated for credit for different projects. Prerequisites: One 30000-level RLST course and permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: UND
1-4 Credits

RLST 49400 Tutorial: Religion (LA)

Work by student and teacher together on a problem or project of interest to both. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; one course in religion; two additional courses in the humanities and/or social sciences. depending on instructor and student interest. (IRR)
Attributes: UND
1-4 Credits

RLST 49600 Seminar: Religion (LA)

Small group study of a topic not offered otherwise in the curriculum or not offered at the same level. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: One course in religion; two courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; permission of instructor. (IRR)
Attributes: HU
3 Credits