Latin American Studies

Annette Levine, Associate Professor and Co-Coordinator
Patricia Rodriguez, Associate Professor and Co-Coordinator
 

Latin America is an extraordinarily diverse area, encompassing a wide variety of cultures, political units, economies, languages, and environments. The goals of the Latin American studies minor are to foster greater knowledge about Latin America and to explore the cultural contributions of that area to the global community. The minor aims to expand students’ views concerning the multicultural nature of the peoples of Latin America and to emphasize the interactions between indigenous and introduced cultures in this region, both past and present. The Latin American studies minor will be useful to students envisioning careers in government, business, journalism, community service, public health, education, or the environment. Students interested in pursuing graduate work in any field related to Latin America will also find such a minor to be important.

Minor Requirements

CORE COURSES
Select one of the following:3
Modern Latin American Art
Modern Latin America
Latin American Politics
Latin American Civilization and Culture
Introduction to Latin American Literature
Global Context Course
Selected from the list of courses maintained by the coordinators3
Electives
Selected from the list of courses maintained by the coordinators 112
Language Proficiency
Intermediate language or placement at the 300-level; only 3 credits of intermediate-level language may count towards the minor0-12
Portfolio0
The portfolio will be completed during the last semester of coursework in the minor, under the guidance of the program coordinator(s).
Total Credits18-30

Additional requirements for the minor

  • No more than 9 credits may be taken from a single department.
  • No more than 3 credits of independent study may count toward the minor.
  • 3 credits are allowed to overlap with each of the student's majors and minors.
  • Students may transfer up to 6 credits towards the Latin American Studies minor (only 3 credits of which are from a grammar/conversation course).

Completing the Required Portfolio

Students will select at least two artifacts from their coursework and write a brief rationale addressing their minor coursework and experience (including internships, study abroad, and participation in program events, as relevant), especially how they gained a historical understanding of the idea of “Latin America” and how their courses helped them understand Latin America’s relationship to other parts of the world. Additionally, students will craft a short (2-3 page) reflective essay addressing the following: How has pursuing an interdisciplinary study of Latin America, taking courses from a range of disciplinary perspectives, together with any internships, study abroad, extracurricular activities and/or participation in LAS program events, shaped their understanding of contemporary issues in the region?