Education

Peter C. Martin, Associate Professor and Chair of Graduate Programs

The School of Humanities and Sciences offers three graduate degrees: a master of arts in teaching (M.A.T.) degree in adolescence education, a master of arts in teaching (M.A.T.) degree in agriculture education, and a master of science (M.S.) degree in childhood education. The M.A.T. programs prepare liberal arts and sciences graduates for teaching careers in agriculture education grades K-12, and in adolescence education grades 7-12 in the following subject areas: biology, chemistry, earth science, mathematics, physics, English, French, Spanish, and social studies. The M.S. in childhood education prepares liberal arts and sciences graduates for teaching careers in elementary education, grades 1-6.

All three graduate programs are registered with and approved by the New York State Department of Education. Graduates of the M.A.T. and M.S. programs who pass state certification exams are fully eligible for initial teaching certification in adolescence education (grades 7-12), agriculture education (grades K-12), and childhood education (grades 1-6) in New York State, which also has interstate reciprocity agreements with more than 30 other states and jurisdictions.

The design of each M.A.T. curriculum combines an introduction to the field of education with continued study of the student’s academic discipline. M.A.T. students complete 24 graduate credits in education and 12 credits of coursework in the discipline. These full-time, 13-month programs begin in late May each year.

The childhood education graduate program begins in late May each year, continues through the summer, fall, and spring semesters, and concludes in late June of the following year. Students in the childhood education program complete 38 credits of graduate study.

The graduate programs in education are intensive and academically rigorous. Students enroll full-time in graduate coursework and also participate in field experiences in school and community settings.

Core components of the education programs include:

  • The integration of theory and practice in coursework and field experiences
  • Opportunities to observe, tutor, and teach in multiple and diverse settings, including schools in the Ithaca area and in New York City’s Harlem community (Frederick Douglass Academy and Washington Heights Academy)
  • An emphasis on culturally responsive teaching that supports the personal and academic achievement of all learners
  • Collaboration with families and community to enhance school and classroom effectiveness
  • Ongoing participation in the processes of reflective practice and teacher inquiry


Completion of the M.A.T. and the M.S. programs requires

  1. the preparation of an electronic professional development portfolio, and
  2. a paper and presentation documenting a classroom-based teacher inquiry project.

The Department of Education in the School of Humanities and Sciences

The Department of Education coordinates all teacher education programs, both undergraduate and graduate, for the School of Humanities and Sciences. The Office of Teaching and Certification, housed in the Department of Education, assists all teacher education students with issues pertaining to teacher certification. This office also maintains data on all student teacher placements and facilitates mentor-teacher payments.

Unit-Wide Assessment Systems in Ithaca College Teacher Education Programs

The All-College Teacher Education Unit at Ithaca College requires all teacher education students, regardless of program area, to be reviewed at four programmatic transition points during their course of study. Continuation in a teacher education program is contingent upon the student successfully meeting the requirements of each transition point review; therefore, admission into one of the Ithaca College Teacher Education Programs does not guarantee that a student will be allowed to participate in the semester-long student teaching experience or to be a program completer eligible for teaching certification. Graduate students in education must successfully complete unit-wide reviews at the following transition points:

  1. Admission to Professional Education (admission to the graduate program);
  2. Admission to Student Teaching;
  3. Completion of Student Teaching; and
  4. Completion of Program.

As part of these reviews, student progress in meeting the Ithaca College Teacher Education Standards, the New York State Teaching Standards, the IC Teacher Education Professional Qualities and Dispositions, and the standards of the relevant Specialized Professional Association is assessed by program-specific reviewers. Specific details about the graduate program's particular requirements and procedures, including supports for students who do not meet the criteria for a review, can be found in the program handbook, which is distributed and reviewed at the program orientation in May.

Program Requirements

In addition to the course and field experiences required for completion of the graduate programs in education, graduate students in education must also satisfy the following requirements:

  1. All teacher education candidates at Ithaca College must meet the state requirement for college-level study in a language other than English or demonstrate equivalent proficiency. Candidates admitted to the graduate programs in education who have not yet met this requirement must do so prior to graduation from the graduate program.
  2. Students admitted to the graduate programs in education with outstanding requirements must complete those requirements by the date stipulated in the letter of admission.
  3. All graduate students in education must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0, with grades of B or better in all education courses. A grade of B- does not qualify.
  4. EDUC 60000 and EDUC 51210 constitute a full course load during the student teaching semester. No additional courses may be taken during this semester nor can teacher candidates participate in any extra-curricular activities that may have the potential to affect time available for teaching and preparation. During the semester of student teaching, graduate students may not play a varsity sport or participate in theatre productions or musical ensembles at the College. Note that it is the responsibility of graduate students to provide their own transportation to student teaching placement sites.
  5. All candidates for initial certification in New York must successfully complete certification exams and performance assessments required by the state for the applicant's intended teaching certificate. Candidates who intend to apply for certification in other states are encouraged to access the websites in those states to determine any additional exams and/or requirements for certification.

Tuition Scholarships and Graduate Assistantships

Tuition scholarships and graduate assistantships are available on a competitive basis and are awarded to students with strong academic records. Graduate Assistants support program-area faculty with research and community service projects, especially those connected with the College’s school and community partnerships. Applicants interested in applying for tuition scholarships and/or graduate assistantships should refer to the additional information provided in the Financial Aid section.

Related Programs

Ithaca College also offers graduate programs in these other education disciplines:

  • Health Education 
  • Physical Education
  • Music Education
  • Teaching Students with Speech and Language Disabilities

EDUC 50000 Professional Development Seminar

Seminar in the development of a personal philosophy of education; the preparation of a professional portfolio; and the design, completion, and presentation of an action research project. Students must pass two summer semesters of this course, one in the first summer of the program, and the other in the final summer of the program. Required. Pass/fail only. (Sum)
Attributes: TE
0 Credit

EDUC 50100 Literacy Development and Second Language Acquisition (LA)

Studies second language and literacy development in a sociolinguistic framework through readings and research, class discussions, cooperative projects, and 20 hours of community service learning. Through varied pedagogical approaches, students will learn about literacy and second language acquisition as they apply it in actual hands-on experiences with language learning students. Students will then apply the second language concepts to teaching practices. Semester culminates in cooperative group lesson plan projects demonstrating teaching strategies designed to promote listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills for all students. (SU,F,Y)
Attributes: TE, UND
3 Credits

EDUC 50300 The Exceptional Child and the Classroom (NLA)

Analysis of the instructional elements, modifications, and behavioral management techniques for the unique needs of exceptional children in middle and secondary, subject-specific class settings; explores the role of teachers and other school professionals and parents in providing services to these students; development of appropriate I.E.P.s and review of state and federal laws governing students with disabilities. (SU,F,Y)
Attributes: TE
3 Credits

EDUC 50510 Pedagogy and Practice for the Mathematics Teacher (NLA)

Examination of current research and practice in the effective teaching of mathematics at the middle and high school levels. Focus on national and state standards in mathematics, instructional planning and differentiation, appropriate use of technology, approaches to assessment, and the integration of literacy in the mathematics curriculum. Introduction to professional organizations, journals, and resources. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing or permission of instructor. (F, Y)
Attributes: TE
3 Credits

EDUC 50810 Pedagogy and Practice across the Disciplines (NLA)

Research and practice in models of teaching, motivation, and classroom management that span the disciplines and promote effective teaching at the middle and high school levels. Emphasis on instructional planning, assessment of student learning, differentiation, and the integration of literacy across the disciplines. Introduction to structured observation, reflective practice, and action research. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing or permission of instructor.
Attributes: TE
3 Credits

EDUC 50910 Pedagogy and Practice in the Teaching of Social Studies (NLA)

Examination of current research and practice in the effective teaching of social studies at the middle and high school levels. Focus on national and state standards in social studies, mastery of theoretical concepts and their application in the classroom, instructional planning and differentiation, appropriate use of technology, approaches to assessment, and the integration of literacy in the social studies curriculum. Introduction to professional organizations, journals, and resources. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing or permission of instructor. (F, Y)
Attributes: TE
3 Credits

EDUC 51010 Pedagogy and Practice for the Science Teacher (NLA)

Examination of current research and practice in the effective teaching of science at the middle and high school levels. Focus on national and state standards in science, instructional planning and differentiation, appropriate use of technology, approaches to assessment, laboratory organization and safety, and the integration of literacy in the science curriculum. Introduction to professional organizations, journals, and resources. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing or permission of instructor. (F, Y)
Attributes: TE
3 Credits

EDUC 51110 Pedagogy and Practice for the English Teacher (NLA)

Examination of current research and practice in the effective teaching of English at the middle and high school levels. Focus on national and state standards in English language arts, instructional planning and differentiation, appropriate use of technology, approaches to assessment, and support for students’ literacy development. Introduction to professional organizations, journals, and resources. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing or permission of instructor. (F, Y)
Attributes: TE
3 Credits

EDUC 51210 Seminar in Reflective Practice (LA)

Taken concurrently with EDUC 60000. Critical reflection on teaching and learning, including content knowledge, planning and instruction, positive learning environment, diversity, technology, assessment, collaboration and outreach, and professional development. Literacy issues and methodologies. Teachers as action researchers. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing. (Y)
Attributes: TE
3 Credits

EDUC 51310 Pedagogy and Practice of Teaching Languages Other Than English (NLA)

Examination of current research and practice in the effective teaching of languages other than English at the middle and high school levels. Focus on national and state standards in the teaching of modern languages, instructional planning and differentiation, appropriate use of technology, approaches to assessment, and issues related to second language acquisition and literacy development. Introduction to professional organizations, journals, and resources. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing or permission of instructor. (F, Y)
Attributes: TE
3 Credits

EDUC 53200 Educational Programs in Agricultural Science (NLA)

Provides an overview of the organization and structure of programs and curriculum in agricultural science and the professional responsibilities of teachers in agricultural science education. Principles of developing and managing courses, instructional materials, curriculum, and programs in agricultural science education will be discussed. (F, Su, Y)
3 Credits

EDUC 53500 Youth Leadership and Organizations (NLA)

Provides a comprehensive overview of the elements of youth leadership and their relationship to youth organizations. Examines factors affecting membership, purpose, design, operation, and administration of career and technical student organizations, including FFA and 4-H. Field experience required. (F, Su, Y)
3 Credits

EDUC 53800 Advanced Concepts in Agricultural Education (NLA)

This course focuses on advanced concepts in three overarching areas: agriculture laboratory and program establishment, curriculum and program diversity, and professional development and support networks. (F-Sum, Y)
3 Credits

EDUC 59900 Independent Study in Education (LA)

Study with a faculty member or specific problems in education. Written proposal to the graduate chair, describing the terms of the particular project, is required. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (IRR)
1-3 Credits

EDUC 60000 Professional Semester in Education (NLA)

A full semester of observation and supervised teaching at both the middle and high school levels. Additional coursework may not be taken without permission of department chair and coordinator of teacher education. Prerequisites: EDUC50800, one of the following: EDUC 50510, EDUC 51010, EDUC 51110, EDUC 51210, EDUC 51310; concurrent enrollment in EDUC 60100. (F,S,Y)
Attributes: TE, UND
6 Credits

EDUC 60500 Foundations of Language, Literacy, and Culture

Study of research and theory related to literacy development, early childhood through adolescence. Includes attention to language and literacy in inquiry, literacy in diverse families and communities, literate practices inside and outside of classrooms, biliteracy and literacy across cultures, psycholinguistic theories of reading, reader response, and the research on literacy methods, curricula, and texts commonly used in classrooms. (Y, Summer)
3 Credits

EDUC 61000 Teaching and Learning in Diverse Elementary Schools

This course provides an overview of the elementary school curriculum and environment; the roles and responsibilities of childhood educators; the relationship of school, family, and community; research on effective teaching and schooling; principles and practices of motivation, management, and social interaction; and strategies for planning, teaching, and assessing. Emphasis on culturally responsive teaching in diverse school settings. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing, or permission of instructor. Required. (Y)
Attributes: TE
3 Credits

EDUC 62000 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary School Social Studies

This course focuses on the content and design of the social studies curriculum in the elementary school; current research, theory, and standards in social studies; strategies for instruction, differentiation, and assessment; and available resources. Integration of literacy and technology. Emphasis on community and citizenship, critical thinking, multidisciplinary approaches, and the use of primary resources. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing, or permission of instructor. Required. (Y)
Attributes: TE
3 Credits

EDUC 63000 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary School Science

This course focuses on the content and design of the science curriculum in the elementary school; current research, theory, and standards in science; strategies for science instruction, differentiation, and assessment; laboratory procedures and safety practices; and available resources. Integration of content-area literacy and technology. Emphasis on the development of an inquiry-oriented approach. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing, or permission of instructor. Required. (Y)
Attributes: TE
3 Credits

EDUC 64000 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary School Mathematics

This course focuses on the content and design of the mathematics curriculum in the elementary school; current research, theory, and standards in mathematics; strategies for mathematics instruction, differentiation, and assessment; and available resources. Integration of content-area literacy and technology. Emphasis on children's conceptual understandings of mathematics and the development of pedagogical proficiency for using both "traditional" and "reform" math curricula. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing, or permission of instructor. Required. (Y)
Attributes: TE
3 Credits

EDUC 65000 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary School Language Arts and Literacy

This course focuses on the content and design of the language arts and literacy curriculum in the elementary school; current research, theory, and standards in literacy, strategies for literacy instruction, differentiation, and assessment; and available resources. Emphasis on reading processes, writing processes, word study (including phonemic awareness, word analysis, spelling, and vocabulary), listening, speaking, and dramatic expression. Integration of technology. Field experience is required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing, or permission of instructor; EDUC 50100. (F, Y)
Attributes: TE
3 Credits